Sasak Sade Village

A glimpse of Sasak life in Rembitan, Lombok

Lombok is predominantly peopled by the Sasak tribe, numbering around 3 million or around 80% of the population. Although the lumbung, Sasak vernacular architecture for a granary is quiet visible around Mataram, and is emblematic of the island’s Sasak culture, it is in the Sasak Sade Village in Rembitan where one can appreciate the tribe’s way of life and heritage.

Visitors are greeted with a traditional musical ensemble in traditional dress, and already, the craftsmanship of their musical instruments, from the wooden gong holders slung by the necks to the batik like covering of the drum’s body, already caught my attention. One by one, we were welcomed with piecese of woven scarf placed over our shoulders.

As soon as we gathered around the clearing, we were welcomed by one of the villagers and introduced us to some traditional performances: the tarian gendang belek, a welcome dance where two men with those huge drums perform a dance while playing the instrument; the petuk dance which is performed by boys who will undergo circumcision –> their facial makeup is kind of interesting; peresaian dance, a ritual warrior dance and the amak tempengus, performed by the court jester to entertain the sultan.

Sasak houses are rather modest and echoes our very own bahay kubo except that it has a receiving area made with flooring a mixture of soil and cow dung. Sleeping quarter is at the second floor. Roofing, like most around Southeast Asia, is steeply inclined so that rain water just slides down. Weaving is a major livelihood and the Sasak has specific motifs reflective of their culture.

A traditional musical ensemble greets visitors to the Sasak Sade Village in Rembitan

A traditional musical ensemble greets visitors to the Sasak Sade Village in Rembitan

An ornate wooden gong holder

An ornate wooden gong holder

The 'court jester' Amak Tempengus being performed

The ‘court jester’ Amak Tempengus being performed

Sasak villagers perform ritual dances and fights for visitors.

Sasak villagers perform ritual dances and fights for visitors.

Weaving is one of the important livelihood of the Sasak

Weaving is one of the important livelihood of the Sasak

Soil and cow dung makes for this flooring of a traditional Sasak house. The cow dung is mixed to prevent mosquitoes from entering the abode

Soil and cow dung makes for this flooring of a traditional Sasak house. The cow dung is mixed to prevent mosquitoes from entering the abode

The lumbung, traditional vernacular architecture of the Sasak which is used as a granary

The lumbung, traditional vernacular architecture of the Sasak which is used as a granary

Traditional mosque architecure. The Sasak are Muslims, having converted to Islam in the 16th to 17th centuries.

Traditional mosque architecure. The Sasak are Muslims, having converted to Islam in the 16th to 17th centuries.

Shelled tamarind fruit is left to air dry. This is one of the ingredients used in Sasak cooking.

Shelled tamarind fruit is left to air dry. This is one of the ingredients used in Sasak cooking.

Sasak Sade Village
Rembitan, Lombok

Cozy room in Golden Tulip Hotel where we stayed in Lombok

Cozy room in Golden Tulip Hotel where we stayed in Lombok

Where to stay

The Golden Tulip Hotel in Mataram is a good base to stay in Lombok. It’s a beautiful 4 star hotel that has a well designed, high ceilinged lobby and restaurant area with daily breakfast buffets and diners can also eat al fresco beside the picturesque pool. The rooms are cozy and comfortable with floor to ceiling windows showing off the Lombok countryside. I especially loved the mountain view room which can be dramatic at sunrise.

Golden Tulip Mataram
No.40,, Jl. Jend. Sudirman
Rembiga, Mataram – Lombok
Nusa Tenggara Bar. 83239, Indonesia
+62 370 6170999
http://www.goldentulipmataramlombok.com/en

This trip made possible through the Wonderful Indonesia program of the Ministry of Tourism. Check out the official website, or follow them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. But don’t forget to Like my Langyaw Media Facebook page for updates.

For stories during my WONDERFUL INDONESIA trip, click on the TRIP OF WONDERS tag.

Estan Cabigas is freelance photographer, blogger and writer based in Makati City, the Philippines. A true blue Cebuano, he makes stunning images and meaningful photo stories. His work has been published in local and international publications including National Geographic Magazine, Geo (Germany), Sunday Times Magazine (London) and other publications. He is also a peripatetic traveler and has traveled to all 81 Philippines provinces. I'm open for work, collaborations and inquiries, including hotel, restaurant and site features and reviews.

One Comment

  1. Estan Cabigas (@EstanCabigas)
    August 29, 2016 @ 7:01

    Sasak village life #tripofwonders #wonderfulindonesia @indtravel

    https://t.co/ODB9jCbp3r https://t.co/iHXaoHbFfr

Leave a Reply