puto_calasiao_1

Yummy puto calasiao and a local resto

Kutchinta, left, and puto calasiao, right, ubiquitous native snacks of Pangasinan

Through the invitation of Micamyx, fellow travel blogger who hails from Dagupan, a bunch of us bloggers went to the northwestern province of Pangasinan to enjoy and discover what this beautiful place has to offer. The town of Calasiao is not only famous for its beautiful Spanish colonial era church which is said to be the model for the Cagayan style of church design. It is equally famous for its little morsels that are found sold not only in the town but even outside of it and reaching as far as Manila.

Stalls of pasalubong items

Native rice cakes are quite common in the Philippines, an affinity that is shared throughout the rice eating countries of Southeast Asia. But its homogeneity is anything but. In each country, province or even town, have their own homegrown version. Calasiao is no different.

Just a stone’s throw from the church grounds is the hub of Calasiao’s puto, kutchinta and pasalubong. But the first two, both derived from ground malagkit or sticky rice are famous. Puto calasiao is small, white and sticky. Bite sized morsels that are sweet and filling snacks. Kutchinta, while common in other places in the country is smaller, at the same size as the former and can be eaten even without grated coconut.

Packing an order of puto calasiao

Whenever I do come here, I only buy both and usually don’t mind the other items which are rather common. Other than the ordinary (white) puto calasiao, there are also other flavors (in different colors), with or without cheese.

It’s a good pasalubong item as well as something to munch on while traveling on the bus and costs P100 per kilo for the plain and flavored, P120 with cheese version.

Puto calasiao
Calasiao Puto Producers and Vendors Association
Poblacion, Calasiao, Pangasinan

Flavorful and juicy Big Burgerdon (P160)

Korean Beef (P165)

Calasiao is not only home to the traditonal. It has its own homegrown fast food resto too. Most big mall goers in the country know Plato Wraps as a kiosk type foodcart that offers wrap sandwiches. In Calasiao, it has a restaurant that offers a broad range of food.

Interior of Plato Wraps Dine-In

Plato Wraps Dine-In not only has the signature wrap sandwiches but also fast food as well as regular meals.

As we dropped by here for lunch, I had their Big Burgerdon which was juicy and sating. A friend had Korean Beef while another had French Toast with Bacon. Plato Wraps Dine-In is a good stop for quick and good meals.

Plato Wraps Dine-In (renamed Panaderia Antonio Bakery and Restaurant)
De Venecia Highway
Calasiao, Pangasinan
522-0007/515-8237

Estan Cabigas is freelance photographer, blogger and writer based in Makati City, the Philippines. A true blue Cebuano, he makes stunning images and meaningful photo stories. His work has been published in local and international publications including National Geographic Magazine, Geo (Germany), Sunday Times Magazine (London) and other publications. He is also a peripatetic traveler and has traveled to all 81 Philippines provinces. I'm open for work, collaborations and inquiries, including hotel, restaurant and site features and reviews.

2 Comments

  1. Micamyx|Senyorita
    February 27, 2012 @ 2:08

    Thanks Kuya Estan! Btw, Plato Wraps Dine-In is now called Panaderia Antonio Bakery and Restaurant 😀

  2. » The Pangasinan Break Roundup | Langyaw: Sojourns and Off-the-Beaten Path Travels
    March 11, 2012 @ 13:13

    […] has pigar-pigar that locals take time out in Galvan St. For dessert, Calasiao has delicious puto calasiao, kutchinta and, for those who wants fast and cheap meals from a homegrown resto, Plato Wraps Dine-in (renamed […]

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