drama_1

Near drama at the Babuyan Channel

Emergency remedy while the 'katig' is being tied when two of the three ties snapped while crossing the turbulent Babuyan Channel

Calayan Is. in red

I was on a writing and photography assignment in Calayan Island in the Babuyanes and in between, I got to enjoy this piece of paradise this part of the Philippines. It was just three kilometers from our destination and the coast of Claveria was already in sight: hills, the coastline dotted with colorful structures and the mouth of the Kabicungan River, where we will finally enter, but the waves were already huge and traveling for the past few hours was enough to put our nerves to the test.

Four hours and thirty minutes earlier, four of us were saying our goodbyes to friends at the beach of Calayan Island while boarding the small lampitaw (motorized pump boat). The morning was sunny and the sea was calmer than expected but not as calm as when we traveled to this island a few days before. But it rained the previous night and the sunset was quite red. According to our weatherman from PAGASA, change is on the onset.

Making it to shore

It was already an hour from the beachline when the waves started to become bigger than what we experienced before. With the news of a low pressure area in the lower part of the country, we were expecting a rough ride to Claveria. Approaching Dalupiri and then later, Fuga Island, the waves were much bigger that we’ve been soaked wet from the sprays but something that’s still manageable.

It was only past Fuga, where it is already open sea that the waters in the Babuyan Channel got more turbulent with waves bigger than the previous hours. Looking ahead of us, it gets scary at times as one can really sea the formation of waves that then hits the lampitaw. Many times, we have to ride the crest of the waves as we have to charge head on as these were going against us.

When we were already around three kilometers from Claveria, suddenly, one of the three nylon ties of the right katig, outrigger, snapped. At first we didn’t bother with it much, and I just looked at it from time to time but due to the turbulent seas and rough movement of the lampitaw, the middle tie snapped. This time, we were alarmed. While the vessel continued to go against the big waves, the thought of losing the outrigger fully and capsize the boat was just too scary that we shouted at the pilot to tie it.

He stopped his engine while we were still beset with waves. He was unusually calm while directing us to stay at the left side. He then commanded his companion to get the rope and tie the two points together. One of my companions was already holding a styro box while frantically calling someone through his mobile and telling what happened to us. Because, unfortunately, and I don’t know why it never dawned on us, there were no life jackets available. That made it more nerve wracking.

I was silent. I was intently looking at the ties, at the waves and at my companions. And I was also thinking:

I’ve been through this before, on a smaller boat in Homonhon where the waves from the Pacific Ocean were much bigger. I should not be afraid.

After a few minutes, the right outrigger was tied to the three points again and we were quite relieved. The boat’s motor roared and off we charged through the waves until we arrived safe and sound a hundred meters from the mouth of the Kabicungan River.

Later, I learned why the boat’s pilot was calm. He had a more deadly experience: his boat capsized and was floating for five days with two other fishermen in the Babuyan Channel only to be fished off in the waters in Taiwan.

Estan Cabigas is freelance photographer, blogger and writer based in Makati City, the Philippines. A true blue Cebuano, he makes stunning images and meaningful photo stories. His work has been published in local and international publications including National Geographic Magazine, Geo (Germany), Sunday Times Magazine (London) and other publications. He is also a peripatetic traveler and has traveled to all 81 Philippines provinces. I'm open for work, collaborations and inquiries, including hotel, restaurant and site features and reviews.

9 Comments

  1. Bugoy
    June 20, 2011 @ 6:50

    scary!

    i hope by the time i already make up my mind to come and visit babuyan, there would be an ATR flight already! hahaha

  2. Bonzenti [ Con Tour Blog ]
    June 20, 2011 @ 10:34

    What a scary experience. Are there available life jacket on board the boat?

  3. estan
    June 20, 2011 @ 12:24

    @bugoy, april is a good time to travel. they’re planning to have a small runway, by the way
    @bonzenti, nah, mao bai kay wa jud life jacket 🙂

  4. Paul
    June 21, 2011 @ 8:20

    Thunder! I mean you have tested the thunder. Though it really seems adventurous as we do not feel the same all the time. I hope that I would my trip to Babuyan

  5. estan
    June 21, 2011 @ 11:01

    @paul, you should try the babuyanes. great place 🙂

  6. » How to get to the Calayan Islands | Langyaw: Sojourns and Off-the-Beaten Path Travels
    June 25, 2011 @ 11:55

    […] in Cibang Cove and enjoying the view of Caniwara Cove from the heights of Nagudungan, the sea gets rough and no vessel dares travel. Then your stranded until it is possible to go. Or, you can hire a […]

  7. ma
    July 14, 2011 @ 23:49

    scary:-( got one scary experience on my boat trip from Coron to El Nido.thanks for sharing.. can’t get enough of all the “kwento”..

  8. LINA C. ABOGADIE
    July 17, 2011 @ 15:08

    Part of being a seasoned traveller is how to stay calm during turbulent times. I had encountered the same experiences and those moments brought me closest to my Creator! Prayers really produce miracles. As long as one is ready to face his/her Final Judge, there’s nothing to be afraid of.

  9. » Seeing rugged & wild Boracay for the first time | Langyaw: Sojourns and Off-the-Beaten Path Travels
    May 2, 2012 @ 11:32

    […] I said to myself, nothing to be alarmed at, really. I’ve been to this before, in Palaui and Babuyan Channel and much […]

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